SPLASH! milk science update: August 2016

This month’s issue features how dairy improves satiety, human milk improves long-term heart health for premature babies, human milk mercury levels are higher in the Amazon, and genomic selection improves the health and productivity of dairy cows.

Dairy Products Could Significantly Increase Satiety

Dairy Products Could Significantly Increase Satiety

Obesity is a major public health issue—with no easy remedies. One potential solution involves consuming foods that increase satiety, thus reducing appetite for later meals and helping with weight loss. So far, a variety of foods have been shown to affect satiety, including soda, fruit drinks, and milk. Researchers have been particularly interested in using dairy for this purpose, but studies on how dairy products influence appetite have had conflicting results. Read More...

Mercury in the Amazon, and Lysozyme C

Mercury in the Amazon, and Lysozyme C

Organic mercury can accumulate in the bodies of animals, humans included. When it does, it has been known to have harmful effects. But for remote communities living where mercury has occurred naturally at high levels for thousands of years, responding to new knowledge about the chemical is far from simple. Recently, researchers from several city-based universities in Brazil travelled to small settlements along the Amazon River’s largest tributary to measure levels of mercury in women’s breast milk. This research is noteworthy because it has identified the enzyme in breast milk that mercury can become associated with—which is a first step to understanding how to remove it. Read More...

Genomic Selection Accelerates Improvements in Health and Productivity of Dairy Cows

Genomic Selection Accelerates Improvements in Health and Productivity of Dairy Cows

The introduction of genomic selection into dairy cattle selective breeding programs has been greatly anticipated and is a remarkable example of the benefits of genomic technology. Made possible because the systems for selective breeding were already well developed in dairy, and the widespread use of artificial insemination meant that new developments could be delivered quickly. First introduced in the USA in 2008, there has now been sufficient time to generate enough data to assess its impact. Read More...