SPLASH!® milk science update: August 2017 Issue

This month’s issue features dairy and defense against kidney disease, human milk oligosaccharides and immunity, Holder pasteurization’s impact on nutrients, and human milk oligosaccharides and Streptococcus.

Dairy Consumption Reduces Risk of Kidney Disease

Dairy Consumption Reduces Risk of Kidney Disease

Dairy foods are best known for promoting a healthy skeleton, but bones are not the only tissue to reap their health benefits. The very same dairy ingredients—calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and protein—that build and maintain a healthy skeleton have demonstrated protective effects on cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and hypertension. And now a growing body of evidence suggests habitual dairy consumption may benefit the kidneys as well. Read More...

Holder Pasteurization Has Limited Impact on the Nutrients in Human Milk

Holder Pasteurization Has Limited Impact on the Nutrients in Human Milk

Holder pasteurization, or HoP, is used the world over to help ensure that the milk distributed by human milk banks is safe for infants to consume. Thanks to its broad effectiveness at destroying a long list of bacteria and viruses—including HIV and Ebola—HoP is recommended by the World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics. But does raising the temperature of human milk to 62.5°C for half an hour break down any of its constituents such that the nutritional content of milk is affected? This second article in a five-part series about HoP finds that the evidence on this topic is relatively thin: different methods of evaluating the composition of milk have frequently led to different conclusions. Overall, however, even though some studies indicate that several vitamins, iron, fats, and certain proteins can be altered by HoP, researchers rarely consider the nutritional changes to be clinically relevant. Read More...