SPLASH!® milk science update: December 2017 Issue

This month’s issue features iodine in milk, lower risk of endometriosis, donor milk, and human milk oligosaccharides.

Milk Alternatives Can Leave Consumers Short on Iodine

Milk Alternatives Can Leave Consumers Short on Iodine

Milk is well known for being the primary dietary source of calcium, but it may be a surprise to learn that, in the U.S. and U.K., milk is also the leading dietary source of iodine. Some of these countries’ consumers are steering away from dairy because of intolerance, allergy, or personal dietary choices. However, researchers have found organic milk and milk-alternative drinks like soy, almond, and hemp milk have only a fraction of the iodine found in conventional milk, indicating that many of those avoiding conventional dairy—especially pregnant and nursing women—may inadvertently be placing themselves at risk for iodine deficiency. Read More...

Breastfeeding Associated with Lower Risk for Endometriosis

The benefits of breastfeeding are nearly always considered from the perspective of the infant, but breastfeeding also has positive effects on the health of the mother. The hormonal changes associated with lactation may lower the risk of developing many chronic diseases, including breast and ovarian cancer. The results of a new study of over 70,000 women suggest that these same hormonal changes may also lower the risk of developing endometriosis. Read More...

Donor Milk Research: A Conversation with Sharon Unger

Donor Milk Research: A Conversation with Sharon Unger

Sharon Unger is a neonatologist who conducts trials on the developmental outcomes of preterm infants who are fed donor milk. She works closely with Debbie O’Connor, a dietitian scientist also based in Toronto. Together they chair the Advisory Committee for the Rogers Hixon Ontario Human Milk Bank and are the principle investigators of the OptiMoM and MaxiMoM Programs (Optimizing and Maximizing Mother’s Milk). Here Sharon talks to SPLASH! about those studies. Read More...