SPLASH! milk science update: FEBRUARY 2013 Issue

We are pleased to announce new additions to our editorial staff: Prof. Foteini Hassiotou, Dr. Jeroen Heck, Prof. Kevin Nicholas, Dr. Lauren Milligan, and Prof. Peter Williamson.

This month’s issue features heart-healthy cheese, milk microRNAs, milk-induced temperament, and protective sugars.

Enjoy!

A Hearty Helping of Dairy

A Hearty Helping of Dairy

Most people know they hike the odds of developing cardiovascular disease by incessantly puffing on cigarettes and by eschewing the gym in favor of the TV. Stuffing saturated fats down one’s gullet is another well-known risk factor, leading to an increase in low-density lipoprotein in the blood and thus to clogged arteries. On that basis, dairy products seem unlikely protectors of a healthy heart. But various studies suggest they might be just that, particularly—and bizarrely given its high fat content—cheese. Read More...

Hormones in Mother’s Milk Influence Baby’s Behavior

Hormones in Mother’s Milk Influence Baby’s Behavior

Mammalian young are not just passive creatures allocating mother’s milk solely to survival and growth. The calories young need to be behaviorally active, from the hesitant romping of the young foal to the arm-waving, ear-splitting tantrum of a newborn baby, come from mother’s milk (Hinde and Capitanio, 2010). But other bioactive constituents in mother’s milk, namely hormones, may also influence HOW the infant behaves. Read More...

To Secrete or Not to Secrete

To Secrete or Not to Secrete

On a cruise ship with a Norovirus outbreak, the chance of becoming infected is largely determined by a single gene: FUT2. Likewise, a mother’s “secretor status”—whether or not she secretes certain protective sugars in milk—is determined by this same gene. Want to know more about FUT2 and the protective sugars in mother's milk? Read More...