SPLASH!® milk science update: July 2018 Issue

This month’s issue features gastric ulcers, immune cells in mother’s milk, almond milk, and probiotics and pregnancy.

Cow Milk Can Protect the Gut from Alcohol-Induced Gastric Ulcers

Cow Milk Can Protect the Gut from Alcohol-Induced Gastric Ulcers

Ulcers can be a real pain in the gut, and they’re unfortunately quite common, affecting more than 10% of the world’s population. Drinking alcohol, smoking, stress, and microbial infections are all known to exacerbate these ulcers. Read More...

Milk is Alive with Mom’s Cells

Milk is Alive with Mom’s Cells

Surprises upturn accepted routines and demonstrate how little we really know. A new class of immune cell type, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), was recently and unexpectedly discovered in fresh breast milk, and it promises to radically alter scientists’ understanding of how milk protects babies from infections, and possibly much more. The ground-breaking scientific paper [1] describing this discovery was recently published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association - Paediatrics by Babak Baban and three colleagues from Augusta University. The paper has the modest but revealing title “Presence and Profile of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Human Breast Milk.” Read More...

Almond “Milk”: A Case of Identify Theft?

Almond “Milk”: A Case of Identify Theft?

Juliet Capulet famously asked, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Juliet was able to look past “Montague” and love Romeo in spite of his surname. But when it comes to food and nutrition, names matter. Case in point—plant-based “milks.” Their placement in grocery stores in the dairy case and the use of “milk” on their packaging can give the false impression that they are nutritionally equivalent to cow milk. Although plant-based milk alternatives offer many nutritional benefits and are produced to have the same texture and appearance as milk, they are not a suitable nutritional substitute for cow milk, particularly for children and adolescents. Read More...

Probiotic Milk Reduces Rate of Pre-eclampsia and Pre-term Birth

Probiotic Milk Reduces Rate of Pre-eclampsia and Pre-term Birth

Probiotics are living microorganisms that improve health when they are administered in sufficient numbers. Often, administration means eating—in yogurt form or perhaps as a food supplement. Orally consumed probiotics can shift the composition of vaginal bacteria, making it harder for potentially pathogenic bacterial and yeast species to grow there. Probiotics have also been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. And it is these reports that encouraged a team of Scandinavian scientists to investigate whether consuming probiotic milk products during pregnancy cuts the probability of developing pre-eclampsia or having a spontaneous, pre-term birth. The results of their study are promising, not least because probiotic milk products are cheap and widely available. The next step will be to further investigate the mechanistic details of the effects. Read More...