SPLASH! milk science update: May 2014 issue

This month’s issue features articles about antioxidants in dairy foods reducing inflammation in macular degeneration, the breakdown of human milk proteins in the infant stomach to produce peptides with potential biofunctions, the presence of beta-casomorphins in colostrum and breastmilk that affect serotonin receptors, and clinical studies showing a potential relationship between milk fat globules and cognitive development. Enjoy!

Seeing is Believing: Dairy and Age-related Blindness

Seeing is Believing: Dairy and Age-related Blindness

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the world. The macula is a circular region at the back of the eye and a key structure in the retina. Within the macula is a concentration of cells that are essential for detecting color in high definition, in other words for seeing clearly. This region of the eye is markedly affected by age, and in many older people, degenerates into blindness. A recent epidemiological study identified an association between dairy consumption and reduced incidence of AMD. Read More...

The Milk Peptidome: A Gold Mine of Bioactivities

The Milk Peptidome: A Gold Mine of Bioactivities

If you drank a glass of milk with your breakfast this morning, you may have given your body far more than a dose of bone-strengthening calcium. Recent research suggests that milk also contains protein fragments with the ability to lower blood pressure, inhibit harmful bacterial growth, boost immune system function and enhance calcium absorption. All of these functions have been ascribed to fragments of milk proteins (peptides) that occur naturally in bovine milk. Read More...

Serotonin and the Body

Serotonin and the Body

Serotonin is well known as a chemical that elicits effects on the brain. But it has a vast number of other roles; for example, serotonin affects heart function, as well as milk release from the mammary gland, bladder control and how long it takes a man to ejaculate during sex. In fact, most of the body’s serotonin is not in the central nervous system—and almost all of the 15 serotonin receptors that have been identified in the brain are also found outside of it. Read More...

Can a Revised Recipe Make Formula-fed Infants Smarter?

Can a Revised Recipe Make Formula-fed Infants Smarter?

Breast is best makes theoretical sense because breast milk is the only foodstuff to have evolved specifically to meet the nutritional needs of human infants, as Bruce German, Professor of Food Science and Technology at UC Davis is fond of saying. There are many reasons why the act of breastfeeding itself may be beneficial. But in purely compositional terms, scientists designing infant formulas rightly seek to mimic the real thing. Recently, a team of Swedish researchers ran a study in which they assigned some infants a novel formula with less energy and protein than normal infant formula, and with a higher concentration of fat globule membranes derived from cow’s milk. Read More...