SPLASH!® milk science update: November 2017 Issue

This month’s issue features Holstein breeding, donor milk pasteurization, milk lactose in mammals, and the cheese food matrix.

The Daddy of All Cows

The Daddy of All Cows

Holstein cattle have become the dominant dairy breed worldwide. These black and white cows have become synonymous with dairy in many countries and they produce billions of liters of milk. This has been facilitated by artificial insemination technology that is the basis for herd replacement and genetic improvement programs around the world. With this in mind, Yue et al. conducted a study to examine how much genetic diversity exists in the male chromosomal lineages of modern cattle. Read More...

Alternative Methods to Pasteurize Donor Milk Hold Promise

Alternative Methods to Pasteurize Donor Milk Hold Promise

In the past few months, Splash! has assessed how well Holder pasteurization, or HoP, kills viruses and bacteria, and the extent to which it affects the nutrients, immune proteins, and digestive aids in human milk. Because HoP is widely used by milk banks all over the world, these outcomes are potentially important for a huge number of infants, particularly those born prematurely. In this final article in the series, other methods of pasteurizing milk are brought into focus. Next to HoP, we know relatively little about their performance. Yet various studies show that they hold some promise towards achieving the ideal—a means of reliably preventing germs from proliferating in milk, while also retaining the function of human milk’s proteins. Read More...

Milk Lactose From A to Zebra

Milk Lactose From A to Zebra

If you have a hard time digesting lactose from cow’s milk, you may want to avoid drinking monkey milk. Rhesus macaque monkeys produce milk with 8% lactose, almost twice the amount found in cow’s milk. With a barely detectable quantity of lactose, a better option for intolerant individuals would be milk from grey seals (that is, if you can get past that it is also 70% fishy-tasting fat and probably not the most appetizing choice for your morning bowl of cereal). Read More...

Cheese and Butter Have Different Effects on LDL Cholesterol

Cheese and Butter Have Different Effects on LDL Cholesterol

Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) have long been considered detrimental to cardiovascular health, with dietary guidelines advocating for a restriction of dietary SFAs to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, increased consumption of SFAs may not always be associated with increased CVD risk, and the effects of SFAs on CVD risk may instead depend on the food source. Read More...