Symposium Oral Presentations 2016

How lactation can decode life science’s great challenges

Bruce German, Foods for Health Institute and Dept. of Food Science and Technology,
University of California, Davis, USA

The life sciences are turning to the 21st century’s challenges and opportunities: how to feed 10 billion people, how to produce that food sustainably, how to prevent disease and how to enhance human performance through a century-long lifespan. Lactation, the genetic secret to success of mammalia, has also wrestled with such challenges for hundreds of millions of years. Research and its translation to commercial practice can use the principles learned under this relentless selective pressure of evolution. The IMGC has been guided by lactation as the Rosetta Stone for the genetics of diet... Read More... Download PDF

Emerging hot topics in milk science

Danielle Lemay, Genome Center and Foods for Health Institute, University of California, Davis, USA

In April 2012, the IMGC began publishing an e-newsletter, “SPLASH! milk science update,” which features four articles on emerging topics in milk science each month—that’s 48 new articles on milk science each year. By the time of the IMGC conference in 2016, we will have published over 200 articles! This talk will reveal the most exciting milk science topics of the previous 12 months. It will also include a behind-the-scenes tour of “SPLASH! milk science update,”: who are the current writers and editors, how topics are selected, and the basics of our publication cycle. The SPLASH!... Read More... Download PDF

KEYNOTE: New insight on how milk “farms” the neonate gut microbiota

David Mills, Dept. of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, USA

Human milk contains numerous components that shape the microbial content of the developing infant gastrointestinal tract. A prominent feature of milk is an array of complex glycans and glycoconjugates that serve a passive immune function by sequestering and deflecting pathogens while simultaneously enriching a protective, milk-oriented microbiota (MOM) often dominated by bifidobacteria. Recent research suggests the timing of establishment, and proper function of, a MOM is critical for infant development. An infant’s MOM is initially established through environmental transfer to the gut and... Read More...

Rebuilding the infant gut microbiome: Insights from ecology and evolution

Steve Frese, Evolve Biosystems, Inc., Davis, CA, USA

Steven A. Frese1, Andra Hutton1, Lindsey N. Contreras1, Claire A. Shaw1, Jackelyn Moya2,3, Melissa A. Breck2,3, Annette Fineberg MD4, Mark Underwood5, Jennifer T. Smilowitz2,3 1. Evolve Biosystems, Inc., Davis, CA 2. Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis; 3. Foods for Health Institute, University of California, Davis; 4. Sutter Health, Sutter Davis Hospital, Davis, CA; 5. Department of Neonatology, UC Davis Children’s Hospital, Sacramento, CA The scientific community has been increasingly intrigued by the epidemiologic descriptions of intestinal... Read More... Download PDF

Safety and tolerability following consumption of bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis in exclusively breastfed term infants

Jennifer Smilowitz, Foods for Health Institute and Dept. of Food Science and Technology,
University of California, Davis, USA

Jennifer T. Smilowitz1,2, Melissa A. Breck1,2, Jackeyln Moya1, Annette Fineberg MD3, Kathleen Angkustsiri4,5, Mark Underwood MD5 1. Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis; 2. Foods for Health Institute, University of California, Davis; 3. Sutter Health, Sutter Davis Hospital, Davis, CA; 4. UC Davis MIND Institute, University of California, Sacramento, CA; 5. Department of Neonatology, UC Davis Children’s Hospital, Sacramento, CA For the first six months of life, Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis (B. infantis) is the dominant strain of... Read More... Download PDF

Linking the genome of lactic acid bacteria to the metabolic response of humans having ingested fermented dairy products

Guy Vergères, Agroscope, Institute for Food Sciences, Berne, Switzerland

Fermentation is a major transformation process in the food and beverage industry and up to one third of products consumed worldwide are fermented. Humans have been fermenting foods and beverages since at least seven millennia, first to protect them from microbial spoilage, later to provide them with attractive sensory properties. This dietary behavior is likely to have impacted on physiological functions other than olfactory processes. Only recently in human history, in particular with the pioneering work of Metchnikoff at the beginning of the 20th century, has food fermentation been... Read More... Download PDF

Ruminant milk and soy solids differentially affect growth, colon gene and protein expression, and microbiota profiles in the interleukin-10 gene-deficient mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

Nicole Roy, AgResearch Limited Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand

A.E. Russ1,2,3, M.P.G. Barnett1,3, W. Young1, J. Cooney3,4, R.C. Anderson1, W.C. McNabb1,3,4, N.C. Roy1,3,4 1. Food Nutrition & Health Team, AgResearch Grasslands, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 2. Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 3. Nutrigenomics New Zealand (www.nutrigenomics.org.nz); 4. Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand; Plant and Food Research, Hamilton, New Zealand The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to immune-mediated diseases characterized by chronic intestinal... Read More... Download PDF

Use of the milk microbiome to predict infant fecal bacterial community composition

Janet Williams, Dept. of Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Idaho, Moscow, USA
Student Travel Award Recipient

Janet E. Williams1,2, Benjamin J. Ridenhour4, Christopher H. Remien3, Sarah L. Brooker1,2, James T. Van Leuven6, Michelle K. McGuire5, and Mark A. McGuire1. 1. Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow; 2. Program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Idaho, Moscow; 3. Department of Mathematics, University of Idaho, Moscow; 4. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow; 5. School of Biological Sciences and Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman; 6. Center for... Read More...

Accurate monitoring of living and total bacterial populations in milks for improved microbial management

Zhengyao Xue, Dept. of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, USA
Student Travel Award Recipient

Zhengyao Xue1, Mary Kable1, Jessie Heidenreich2, Jeremy McLeod2 and Maria L. Marco1 1. Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis; 2. Hilmar Cheese Company, Hilmar, CA Milk contains a broad diversity of bacteria that enter milks through farm and processing environments. These bacteria are important determinants of the quality and safety of fluid milk and processed dairy products. Currently employed methods for microbial analysis of milk (and other dairy products) typically target only a limited number of bacterial species, and therefore restrict our... Read More... Download PDF

Identification of sialic acid-utilising bacteria in a piglet caecal community using RNA-SIP

Wayne Young, AgResearch Limited Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand

Wayne Young1, Markus Egert2, Shalome Bassett1, Nicole Roy1,3, and Rodrigo Bibiloni1 1. AgResearch Ltd., Food Nutrition & Health Team, Food & Bio-based Products Group, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 2. Furtwangen University, Faculty of Medical and Life Sciences, Institute of Precision Medicine, Microbiology & Hygiene Group, Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany; 3. Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand; Arla Foods, Denmark Sialic acids are monosaccharides that can be found on the end of sugar chains expressed on cell surfaces. Milk... Read More... Download PDF