Topic: colostrum

Visions of Human Milk Production

Visions of Human Milk Production

One cell, all by itself, can make milk. A single cell makes a very tiny amount, however, while more of them working together make a copious supply (or so we hope). That some mothers are not able to make enough milk is exactly what motivated scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of California, Davis to determine what genes are turned "on" to make milk. Read More...

Surprise: Cow’s Milk Sugars Are Rather Like Human Ones!

Surprise: Cow's Milk Sugars Are Rather Like Human Ones!

Pick up any textbook that runs through the sugars in milk, and you will read that human milk is unusual. It contains more oligosaccharides (medium-length sugars) than the milk of other mammals, and, in particular, most of its oligosaccharides have some subunits of fucose, a small sugar. Farmyard mammals, in contrast, do not make oligos out of fucose. At least, that was the conventional wisdom. But the distinction is now invalid. Read More...

Protective Cells in Breast Milk: For the Infant and the Mother?

Protective Cells in Breast Milk: For the Infant and the Mother?

Babies are well protected and nourished while still in the mother's womb, but what happens after they are born when they are suddenly exposed to a challenging environment full of new and invasive bugs? The mother steps in again by providing breast milk. This magical dynamic fluid contains not only the necessary nutrients for the optimal growth of the infant, but also activated immune cells. Two breakthrough studies show that these immune cells selectively migrate into colostrum and milk. Read More...

Buttermilk as a source of protective glycolipids

Buttermilk as a source of protective glycolipids

Is fat really bad for you? Or could some fat actually be good for your tummy? The common answer might be, "That's impossible." But is it? It turns out that one type of milk fat only recently being studied may actually be beneficial for intestinal health. Read More...

What comes next

What comes next

Keeping funding agencies and researchers properly in the loop, Peggy Neville, who recently retired from the University of Colorado, Denver, has published a review in which she and her coauthors run through four key research priorities in the field how the components of breast milk effect an infant's growth and health, how they impact an infant's brain and behaviour, some key issues of mammary gland biology and, finally, how milk research can help infants born pre-term to obese or undernourished moms. Read More...

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