species: bovine

Adding Bovine Lactoferrin to the Mix

Adding Bovine Lactoferrin to the Mix

The anti-bacterial, ion-binding protein in human and bovine milk is approved for use in infant formula in Spain, South Korea and Japan, but the FDA has not approved its use in the US. If Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status is eventually granted by the FDA, its potential health benefits if added to infant formula may be substantial. Read More...

Identifying Parasites in African Cattle

Identifying Parasites in African Cattle

When African cattle become lazy and their milk production drops, they are said to have 'nagana'-to be depressed, in Zulu. The biological cause of nagana is a parasite, of which there are several species, and which wiggle around like winding corkscrews under a microscope. To work out how to reduce the damage done by these 'trypanosome' parasites, and thus improve the lot of many poor cattle farmers, we need better diagnostics. Recently, a group of researchers in Vienna invented a means of testing for three different species of trypanosome at the same time. Read about their breakthrough here! Read More...

Ripped in Retirement

Ripped in Retirement

Many of the changes that happen with aging are hard to explain. Among them is a difficulty in maintaining and growing muscle mass. This is known as sarcopenia and has been estimated to account for 1.5% of total healthcare expenditures in Western countries. Over time, researchers have shown that a careful combination of resistance training, plus a diet containing sufficient and particular amino acids, can keep you looking buff well into your autumn years. Read More...

Great Expectations for Milk Metabolomics

Great Expectations for Milk Metabolomics

A quick Internet search with the words "genomics" retrieves about 14 million hits, whereas the same search with the word "metabolomics" retrieves a mere 1.1 million hits. This alone is a fair indication that within the "omics" family there are different generations, and metabolomics is one of its youngest members. Read More...

Europe’s First Cheese Makers

Europe's First Cheese Makers

Neolithic farmers would have been hard-pressed to come up with a way to reduce the lactose content in milk. One clever way to do this is by allowing bacteria to digest the milk sugar for you, which also just happens to be a critical first step in the production of cheese. A study published in Nature reveals the origins of cheese making in Europe. Read More...

What Makes a Good Dairy Cow?

What Makes a Good Dairy Cow?

Cattle have been domesticated since the Neolithic Age, but did Stone Age farmers select their cattle? And what about the thousands of years between first domestication and the modern era, how much selection has taken place? In a newly published study, Utsunomiya and colleagues have brought together cattle genetic data from around the world to reveal those regions of the genome that light up with the hallmarks of selection. Read More...

Milk Beats Gatorade at Rehydration

Milk Beats Gatorade at Rehydration

Working out means losing liquid, for some of us more than others. The lost liquid needs to be replaced, particularly if you intend to exercise more on the same day. A whole industry has been built around creating sports drinks to rehydrate athletes—and those of us who can only dream of becoming athletes—quickly and effectively. But for all these branded drinks’ isotonic technicalities, hyperactive coloring, and celebrity sponsorship deals, they tend to come second on rehydration tests behind humble, old milk! Read More...

Milk Protein Kills Cancer Cells and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Milk Protein Kills Cancer Cells and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Wouldn’t it be great if there were a nontoxic cancer treatment that effectively killed tumor cells without causing any harm to healthy cells in the patient’s body? Or how about a chemical that could make antibiotics effective against bacterial strains that have become antibiotic resistant, such as pneumococci or MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus)? Solving just one of these tasks would be a medical miracle, and yet a team of American and Swedish researchers has shown that both are possible. Even more amazing is that the solution to these two seemingly disparate medical issues comes from the same molecule, a protein-lipid complex found in human breast milk called HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells). And unlike its Shakespearean namesake, the actions of milk-borne HAMLET are anything but tragic. Read More...

Mining Animal Biodiversity to Improve Dairy Outcomes

Mining Animal Biodiversity to Improve Dairy Outcomes

Dairy farmers everywhere would rejoice if scientists discovered a way to breed cows that continually produce milk. The answer to this biological riddle may lie in the study of other milk-producing animals. Weird animals produce milk with various lactation strategies. Some produce all of their milk in just a couple days while others produce milk over five years. Some produce copious amounts of milk for a couple days and then not again for several weeks. By comparing the lactation strategies of different animals, researchers can identify exciting new methods of milk production. Read More...

Surprise: Cow’s Milk Sugars Are Rather Like Human Ones!

Surprise: Cow's Milk Sugars Are Rather Like Human Ones!

Pick up any textbook that runs through the sugars in milk, and you will read that human milk is unusual. It contains more oligosaccharides (medium-length sugars) than the milk of other mammals, and, in particular, most of its oligosaccharides have some subunits of fucose, a small sugar. Farmyard mammals, in contrast, do not make oligos out of fucose. At least, that was the conventional wisdom. But the distinction is now invalid. Read More...

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